BLURB, ARTICLE & PUBLICATION


BLURB BY: ANGUS MORRISON 


 


 

 


• Featured in Philippine Star Newspaper '2016 vis-à-vis the 10th Florence International Biennale of Contemporary Art


•  Rome  ­­Journal (Ako ay Pilipino) ‘2015 Filipino artists won the Silver Medal Award and The Key of Florence, Medal of Recognition, vis-à-vis the 10th Florence International Biennale of Contemporary Art


 

• Gone are the Days of Michael '2014 • Oil on linen canvas •160 x 140 cm

The triumph of Evil. The traditional image of archangel Michael, leading God's armies against evil forces in the Book of Revelation, and defeating Satan, is completely reversed in Allanrey "migz" Salazar's "Gone are the days of Michael". Justice, purity and faith are victims of negativity, hatred and violence, while the warning "Evil will prevail if good men do nothing" is placing a call to action: take the right stand in the eternal struggle between good and evil. On closer inspection, it also invites us to ponder the duality of human nature and its role within the greater whole, and to reflect on the internal conflict between the forces of light and the forces of darkness. It's the hidden struggle we all live with every day, sometimes inflicting intangible wounds to ourselves and to others, sometimes healing them, just as when we are guided by faith and justice, just as when art carries a message of hope. The triumph of Good,

by: Giovanni Cordoni '2015 


A RADICAL DEPARTURE


 


EVIL WILL PREVAIL, IF GOOD MEN DO NOTHING !


~Evil Will Prevail, If Good Men Do Nothing” is the catchphrase of Allanrey ‘migz’ Salazar’s mixed media painting on linen canvas. Lucifer, the great deceiver stabs Michael the archangel in the torso with his three-pronged fork and extends the middle dirty finger of his right hand. Michael collapses and will soon drop his sword and judgment scales. Michael, also known as Saint Michael in the Catholic Church, is an archangel of the Judaic, Christian and Islamic religious traditions. He was first mentioned in the Hebrew bible, being considered a defender of Israel, according to the vision of Daniel. Later, the Christian church recruited him for the same role. He is the patron saint of Ukraine, amongst other countries and cities in the world.

Most popularly in culture, he is known from the Book of Revelation in the New Testament as God’s chief angel who battled and defeated Satan. He is usually depicted as a warrior in full armour, brandishing a sword and sometimes, the scales with which he judges souls at the time of Judgement. Lucifer, the embodiment of corruption and evil, sometimes depicted as a dragon, is slain and cast out of heaven and into hell. Not so here. Defeating evil requires a monumental effort. To default on moral responsibility - to refrain from making an intervention when necessary; to avoid confrontation out of fear for personal consequences; to turn a blind eye to abuse; all these defaults will allow evil to triumph.

HBeing a Filipino contemporary artist, Salazar no doubt employs imagery of the Catholic culture from his native land to make radical reinterpretations. To my knowledge, in no way has Michael the archangel ever been depicted in such a manner. Perhaps, in a world of such staggering contradictions concerning morality, it is time to reconsider what archangel Michael truly represents. This picture does not have to be a mark of doom and gloom but rather, a rational observation that can lead to beneficial outcomes, both socially and culturally. This, I think, is the message Salazar could convey with this work. The painting in turn inspires in me a powerful reflection on morals and a wholehearted desire to act against evil.

This grotesque painting entitled “Gone Are The Days of Michael” is an iconic piece of work. I believe that art such as this is a sine-qua-non in our present world, which indeed represent ironic turning of the tables in terms of social, political, cultural and religious iconography. For the artist, you cannot just simply shut your eyes to the malevolence that’s really happening and lurking around you. The great battle of good and evil in this world of ours, the only thing necessary for the triumph of evil, is for good men to do nothing.

By: Incognito 2015



“STEADY” : A CELEBRATION OF FRENCH-FILIPINO

RELATIONS AT GALERIE TALMART IN PARIS

The Talmart Gallery, near the Georges Pompidou Center in Paris, will celebrate the 60th anniversary of diplomatic relations between France and the Philippines on December 7. For the occasion, the gallery will showcase the energy and creativity of “Sanlikha”, an artist-initiative composed of Filipinos of varied artistic professions (painters, filmmakers, etc.) with their studios based in Ile Sait-Denis, a suburb north of Paris.

A month long exhibit by painter Miguel Salazar will be inaugurated emphasizing on his recent works that set the title for the show : STEADY. Likewise, on the day of the opening, will be presented a film and 3 video installations by three other artists from the group.

The film, Mambabarang sa Paris (Un sorcier philippin à Paris), is a film-in-progress signed Glenn Cruz, a filmmaker known for Rehab, Best Short Film at the Manila Film Festival in 1999, O Pag-Ibig, 2nd prize winner for Short Film at the Gawad CCP in 2001, Saludo kay Pidol (2003), a homage to king of Filipino comedy Dolphy, and his latest short film Le Reglement, presented at the recent “48-Hour Film Festival” in Paris. Video installations to complement the film-screening will present recent works of Sandra Palomar “Sanlikha” Paris group of artists.

The exhibit Steady will consist of 15 recent canvasses and 3 sculptures by Salazar. His works consist of layers of pigment merging into delicate and subtle color fields. Lengthily meditated, well composed, and unusual in their dimension, his canvasses are fixed—and this distinguishes them—with nuts and bolts that bring to the fluidity of his superimposed layers, applied often after very long intervals, a stability that gives the title to his series of new works. Nuts, bolts, washers, rivets and iron bars all the more characterize his sculptures. Salazar hails from Caloocan and grew up between Mindoro and Quezon city, before moving to Europe, finally settling in France where he now lives and works.

For film buffs, note that Glenn Cruz’s film will be showing simultaneously in Paris and in Manila on Friday, December 7 : while Galerie Talmart, 22 rue du cloître Saint-Merri, 75004 Paris, will be screening a 20-minute avant-première of Mambabarang sa Paris in the presence of Philippine Ambassador to France H.E. Jose Abeto Zaide, Magnet gallery, AGCOR Bldg. 335 Katipunan Ave. Quezon City, in line with Cinemakatipunan will be doing the same in presence of the director. A concrete and symbolic way to show that, after sixty years, relations between France and the Philippines are undeniably solid, “steady”, and very appropriately synchronized.

By: Sandra Palomar '2007



A TRIBUTE TO JUAN LUNA

Miguel Salazar brings back to life the struggle of the iconic Filipino artist living in Europe in the late 1800’s. The work connects Juan Luna’s plight due to his own experience as an artist living in Paris in the 21st century. This work is a reincarnation of Spoliarium, Luna’s most famous work which acquired the gold medal at Spain’s Exposicion Nacional de Belle Artes in 1884. It now hangs proudly and the first painting that one sees in the National Museum of the Philippines. It is new and fresh blood spilled over old dark bloodstains, like layers of blood indignantly accumulated over time.

In this homage, we see Salazar’s ability to express assertiveness through paint. Here we encounter the value and power of paint, of lightness and darkness. We feel the strength and potency of color. In view of this work, we have the opportunity to feel the artists strife, his cause, his empowerment and in return we empowered. This inspired his work entitled “Hommage à Juan Luna”, completed in 2005. Juan Luna is a Philippine national artist and hero who was part of “Los Indios Bravos” who lived in Europe in the 1880’s (Madrid, Rome, and Paris of La Belle Epoque). Luna’s most famous work is “La Spoliarium”, the painting reflects the condition of the Filipinos (Indios) during the time of Spanish colonization. It reveals the abuses, the maltreatment, and the discrimination of the Spaniards toward the Filipino people that lasted for over a three and a half century. Through painting, during that époque the great artist expressed his observation to the people of his society. In Salazar’s own homage, the violent use of red has a strong symbolic significance. It overwhelms a viewer with it’s power - shouting, struggling and fighting against extreme poverty and extreme corruption. Here, we have two Philippine artists existing in two different ages, with over a hundred years of separation, yet still identifying with the same cause. The difference is the struggle against Spanish colonizers, versus a contemporary struggle against corrupt Indio politicians. Salazar’s 2005 homage represents the bloody scream of hopelessness and anger of today. A scream against apathy for Juan Luna, like a prayer expressed in paint on canvas. The two artists share the same cause, the same patriotism, the same struggle of being a Filipino in a foreign land. One should feel the vibration of energy in each molecule of paint. What already has been said is still not enough.

By: Che Hironaka '2009



STEADY SERIES

The pure product of a man delving deep into his creative domain. Taking a leap of faith, Salazar pushes into the unknown, into the universe, the source, where a man can become his higher, creative self. There is no rationale, no logic, just purely letting go of one’s mind, tapping into the infinite. Unhinged, he uses a metal bolt and nuts that puncture to-and-fro on its canvas to keep things from drifting away completely. The bolt keeps it “STEADY”, keeps the artist grounded and brings him back. On this canvas, like a silver screen, we have the privilege to view this experience. An ethereal encounters of calm and clear. Moreover, the experience is not purely visual.

By: Che Hironaka '2009 



DRAG & DROP

Salazar’s sculptures, entitled “Drag & Drop”, consist of metal rods held onto a clamp with metal washers or circular rings. The viewer can lift up and release these into motion. They slowly start to vibrate as they move down, bringing a hypnotic state by way of the sound that it creates and the vision of it’s vibrating motion, shifting and stirring at a steady velocity. The rhythmic flow of sound can also be manipulated. You may drop rings all together in one go, or you may leave intervals between each ring, or you may choose the amount of rings to drop, to just use one ring at a time. Limitless possibilities, each unique. You experience its energy. It lives and flows. It can either be stimulating or relaxing, energetic or meditative, an experience that can shift depending upon the observer.

By: Che Hironaka '2009



 “STEADY” : La pratique de l’emotion maîtrisée

1 y a une force mysteneuse, dans les commencements de Miguel Salazar, qui tient paradoxalement a Ia culture Philippine. Hiya est, en tagalog, le vocable qui definit le mieux l'origine de cette force : hiya furent les Philippins vis-a-vis des Espagnols et des colonisateurs qui les soumirent, hiya, c'est-a-dire humbles, timides, doux. - -ce qui n'exclut pas les explosions momentanees de passion, de revolte, de reelle violence. L'emotion y prevaut toujours.

Evoquant ses debuts, qui ne sont pas si lointains, Miguel Salazar declare:« J'ai connu, a mon arrivee en Europe, en Allemagne d'abord puis en France, une espece d'eveil. Les yeux s'ouvrent, ici, le creurs'elargrit, peut-etre parce que plus de gens savent apprecier le travail des artistes.»11 lui a fallu cet eveil europeen, le meme que connut son compatrioteJuan Luna, a Ia fin du XIXem siecle. C'est d'ailleurs a Juan Luna, l'ami du heros national et liberateur Jose Rizal, que Miguel Salazar a rendu hommage dans sa troisieme exposition en solo. Cela, pour marquer I' attachement initial (et constant) que ce philippin voue a sa culture d' origine. II a d'ailleurs, en 2006, confirms cet attachement en exposant conjointement avec son camarade et predecesseur le plus illustre, Augusto Albor. 

« Tu es plus contemporain que mol », lui a dit Albor, qui a eu a Iutter, depuis les annees soixante-dix, contre le prejuge local qu'un philippin n'a pas le droit de developper une recherche abstraite. Protege par !'ambiance parisienne, et fort de cet adoubement fraternal. Miguel Salazar s'est attaché patiemment a definir pour lui-meme son caractere proper. Ce sont les resultants de ce travail qu'il expose a Ia galerie Talmart .II a conserve une predilection pour les formats carres et pour les dimensions non standard.  

La dimensions, pour Miguel Salazar, est tellement partie integrante de l'objet produit que toute reproduction est une trahison . II faut un contact non media, une veritable rencontre, pour apprecier pleinement son travail. Si l'on en cherche l'origine, le concept de STEADY (titre et theme de !'actuelle exposition) procede conjointement d'une toile carree d'assez petit format- 50 em par 50 cm---intitulee STEADY (COMPOSITION BROWN), superposition de couches rouge, roullle et ocre, et d'un long rectangle de 162 em par 68 em, a dominante jaune frotte de bistre, avec des traces plus chaudes, dispose verticalement, STEADY(COMPOSITION YELLOW).

L'une et l'autre des deux oouvres sont datees 2006, ce sont les plus anciennes. STEADY (COMPOSITION BROWN) porte en son centre un boulon visse, STEADY (COMPOSITION YELLOW) quatre boulons, un a chacun des quatre coins. De l'aveu de !'artiste, cette derniere composition lui a demande une periode de travail tres longue, au cours de laquelle il l'a souvent abandonnee et reprise, jusqu'a !'intervention de tonalities eclatantes qui, sur une base quasi metallique, ont fait vibrer Ia lumiere. Ce chatoiement ascendant et les quatre boulons qui le fixent donnent une de cles l'ensemble---et peut -etre de !'ensemble des 15 toiles proposees par Ia galerie Talmart: elles sont de Ia lumiere fixee, cadree, verrouillee, chacune selon sa nature et sa couleur et Ia lumiere, a travers le cheminement de preparations successives, sont avant tout expression d'emotion. A ce stade, STEADY pourrait bien etre definie comme Ia pratique de !'emotion maltrisee.

Par !'introduction de boulons dans ses composition, Miguel Salazar semble decliner, sur une base de lumiere plus ou moins aerienne, plus ou mains vibrante, trios themes essentiels (trios themes qui enveloppent toute vie humaine) : le nombril, le teton, Ia croix. On voit a ce premier decryptage, et c'est encore un trait frequent de Ia tradition Philippine, que Ia religion n 'est pas absente. Le nombril, te teton, Ia croix : cette bizarre trinite, pour peu qu'elle soit valide, tire un trait plein de tendresse sur nos destinees. II est seulement strange que ce soit l'acier de STEADY qui nous y amene. La couleur (Ia nuance), Ia matiere, le titre font le caractere proper de chaque reuvre auquel se joint un element qu'il taut ici definir. DOCTRINE OF TIME, 77cm par 77cm, date de 2007, est assez exemplaire pour que nous en tirions l'une des principales le9ons de STEADY. Lnterroge sur le point de savoir a quel element constitutif du monde it convenait d'assoc1er sa recherche : le feu, Ia terre. le bois, l'or (pour rester dans un contexte extreme oriental}, l'air, l'eau etc ... Miguel Salazar a repondu : « Le principal element constitutif de mon travail est te Temps.» Le sens interieur cherche done ici sa position dans l'espace.

II est, de tous tes elements constitutifs d'un tableau le moins visible et pourtant, Miguel Salazar sait tres bien nous dire qu'une ceuvre n'est pas Ia meme suivant qu'on lui a ou non integra cet element: il est sa profondeur. DOCTRINE OF TIME fonctionne en echo avec THINKING REMBRANDT, pour ses couleurs de cendre, cendre. sa tumiere assourdie. II s'en distingue cependant en affichant par places une matiere epaisse, ridee, limoneuse, qui fait le caractere proper de cette meditation: comme si, dans cette enterprise de livrer quelque chose d'intelligible sur ce collaborateur qui est aussi bien un materiau essentiel, it ne pouvait qu'en suggerer Ia nature informe et toujours nouvelle, celle dont II n'aura jamais fini de chercher Ia forme, c'est-a-dire le sens, dans une aventure don't !'exposition STEADY, independamment de l'idee de stabilite et done de relative immobilite qu'elle evoque, apparait comme l'etape initiate. ~exposition STEADY comprend quinze toiles recentes et

trois sculptures ( DRAG & DROP ) de Miguel Salazar. Les toiles, abstraites, longuement meditees. Savamment composees, hors de tout format standard, sont souvent rivees aux chassis par des ecrous et des boulons qui apportent a Ia fluidite de couches superposees a intervallessouvent tres longs, te caractere de stabilite qui donne a !'ensemble son titre. Boulons, ecrous, rondelles, rivets et barres filetees caracterisent plus encore les sculptures. Miguel Salazar, ouvrier recueilli, maitre de ses moyens, a grandi a Quezon City, quertiers populaires du grand Manille, avant de s'installer en Europe. 

By: Markus Talmart, TALMART Editions & Galerie '2007 



AN ALTERED STATE OF CONSCIOUSNESS

At first glance, Allanrey 'Migz' Salazar’s work will evoke a peaceful, very meditative resonance. As you linger on, it builds toward a different nature, completely opposite from that first impression.  One is drawn into the energy and essence….a mix of excessive activity and powerful emotion. Salazar’s large canvas has a force of gravity that moves you within the painting. So much intense feelings, so much passion about to explode, slowly building up, held only by a bolt to keep it from losing it’s self in itself. The person behind the work is intense, raw, earthy, energetic, complex with so many layers. He is very outward, open, eager, strong, masculine, proud, focused, and rebellious.

“What really matters is the work not the man”, Salazar will say, but in reality his human essence or identity exists in everything he has created in his “Steady” series. Salazar’s art reflects his identity in the best way that he can express himself. Through his art, he exists, becomes real and divine. His art is his purpose. Through this book we learn about this man.  In knowing him, we will get to appreciate his art even more….just as we learn to appreciate this man in viewing his art. They are one. Salazar’s paintings may have one bolt holding it together. At other time’s it needs more bolts, or none at all.  Even the artist does not know what the result will be.  This will only be decided in the end, when he feels the work is complete.

The bolt is a way of recovering a sense of self-protection.  It’s a resistance to what the energy might show him, or where it might take him.  In the creative process, one feels out of control. Some people do not like the sense of losing it. He does not want to shut down the flow, but wants to regain his sense of control, which he achieves through the use of his bolts. This is when he has reached the “zero equation”, as he calls the accomplishment of a painting. When there’s no place further to go, he signs it and never touches it again.

Acrylic is an invaluable substance for this artist.  Without it he cannot function and paint the way he does.  He values in it’s durability, it’s cleanliness and easy manipulation.  He believes that one should not lose his workflow once he’s in a creative spell.  To lose momentum, you lose your creative flow. Once he is in the realm, there will be no stopping.  I have observed that Salazar has some obsessive compulsive issues when it comes to painting.  He can never stand a drip of paint lingering on the floor or any surface.  He needs to sponge it off or he is distracted by this and cannot continue to work.  

Salazar’s sculptures, entitled “Drag & Drop”, consist of metal rods held onto a clamp with washers or circular rings. The audience can lift up and release these into motion.  They slowly start to vibrate as they move down, bringing a hypnotic state by way of the sound that it creates and the vision of it’s vibrating motion, shifting and stirring at a steady velocity. The rhythmic flow of sound can also be manipulated.  You may drop rings all together in one go, or you may leave intervals between each ring, or you may choose the amount of rings to drop, to just use one ring at a time. Limitless possibilities, each unique. You experience it’s energy. It lives and flows.  It can either be stimulating or relaxing, energetic or meditative, an experience that can shift depending upon the observer.

 Salazar was born on the 10th of March 1972 in Caloocan City, the Philippines, at the peak of the martial law era of the Marcos regime.  He is the only son in a family of five, with a bank employee for a father and a pre-school teacher for a mother.  He grew up in Baltazar Street, one of the impoverished areas in Manila. In 1983, at the age of 12, the Salazar family moved to the island of Mindoro, also in the Philippines, where he attended high school at The Divine Word College, run by Catholic priests and nuns. For 6 years Salazar got to experience a provincial life. He enjoyed communing with nature, hunting birds, diving, and climbing mountains.  He recalls being teased by his peers as strange, a “weirdo”. He is happiest spending most of his time alone in the forest, in the wild, no poverty, no politics, no hypocrisy, things that made him cautious: “Just me, my emotion and my spirit”. The young Salazar also enjoyed writing poetry, singing as well as playing the guitar and drums, instruments taught by his grandfather who was a member of the Philharmonic Orchestra of the Philippines performing in Hawaii and Guam.   

His father tried to encourage him to be a businessman, concerned by the certain financial struggles facing an artist.  Yet from very early on, they recognized that he was different and had a very strong artistic inclination.  As a young child, he would make sculptures from clay and whatever metal scraps or pieces of wood he could scavenge.Still the obedient son went to business school at Far Eastern University in Manila to fulfill his father’s wishes, before eventually dropped out to pursue his true purpose. In 1998, he turned into the prodigal son and embarked on an “observation tour” as he calls it.  He traveled to Europe to discover the civilization, life and art of the West. He visited Paris, Strasbourg, Wurzburg, Frankfurt, Munich, Hamburg, Stuttgart, Amsterdam, Milan, Barcelona, Rome, Athens staying with relatives or friends due to his meager means.  European architecture inspired him.  In Germany, he had the opportunity to take an intensive course in photography, which is also one of his many interests.

European attitudes had a profound impression on him, especially in how they took pride in their craft no matter how simple.  People showed great respect for artists, unlike his own experience in the Philippines, where he felt people looked down upon artists because it meant that they were poor and strange. He grew up in a society where only money mattered the most.  It was a life changing experience for him which led him to his decision to live in Paris.  At the Louvre, he was moved by the renaissance masters.  He never thought that he would have this opportunity to observe so closely the works of the great masters. From 2005-2006, Salazar studied at the most prestigious art university in France, and perhaps the world.  He succeeded in being accepted into the  École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts without any prior formal training in art. He was self-taught.  At this point, he was essentially an abstract contemporary painter but wanted to study the foundations. He Conducted a Brief Studies of Fine Arts in École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Paris.

Salazar supported himself through school with his art, sometimes sacrificing his basic needs. While his peers would have full art-student gear of paints, brushes.... he would have to go to school with just a couple of tubes of paint and the very bare necessities.  This is where he recognized that having money and all the art supplies does not lead to the creation of a work of art.  He proved to himself that despite his financial difficulties, he could still achieve fulfillment of his need to create. He could still express himself.  He concluded, “Saan ka man naroroon sa mundo, may langit at may lupa pa rin”, which means, “No matter where you are in this world, there will still be Heaven and Earth”.  

 During his interview for school, his Professor asked what he was doing there, when he was already exhibiting his art. He simply answered: “In order to gain wisdom and experience, one lifetime is not enough”. Here he didn’t feel that he was an individual, a simple art student. Rather, he felt and still feels that he is carrying the torch or the cross of being a Filipino in the world.  He also represents the country and the people of the Philippines.  He felt that he had to prove to Ecole de Beaux Arts and to everyone that Filipinos have equal talents, or at least to show them that Filipinos exist in this country too, living diverse professional and creative lives. 

He is also a founding member of SANLIKHA (tagalog word meaning “One Creation”: a group of Filipino artists living in Paris.  Each member, truly proficient in their own discipline (painters, filmmaking, etc.). This artists’ initiative has studios based in Ile Saint-Denis, a suburb north of Paris, and includes Joon Claudio, Sandra Palomar, Gaston Damag, Ding Panganiban, Glenn Cruz, Lannie Maestro. They founded the group in 2007, to promote Philippine art and culture in Europe, and to share a voice, an energy, and creation.

In a sense, they are a new generation of the famed “Los Indios Bravos”, a group of Filipino expatriates in 19th century Europe who proved that Filipinos could stand proudly alongside the finest in the world. Jose Rizal, Mariano Ponce, the Luna brothers, Graciano Lopez Jaena and Marcelo H. del Pilar not only survived but also excelled in Europe by means of their talents, strength of character and the power of their intellect.  “Indios” (“natives”) is what the Spaniards called the Filipinos when they conquered the Philippines. Initially, the SANLIKHA group considered calling themselves “Los Muchachos Bravos”....(“muchachos” meaning servants).

Unfortunately, many educated Filipinos today must work as servants in foreign countries due to economic difficulties in their country.  This remains a struggle for Salazar. It pains him to see his people living as immigrants with very little or no rights whatsoever. He blames all of this on extreme corruption in the Philippine government. This inspired his work entitled “Hommage à Juan Luna”, completed in 2005.  Juan Luna is a Philippine national artist and hero who was part of “Los Indios Bravos” who lived in Europe in the 1880’s (Madrid, Rome, and Paris of La Belle Epoque). Luna’s most famous work is “La Spoliarium”, the painting reflects the condition of the Filipinos (Los Indios) during the time of Spanish colonization. It reveals the abuses, the maltreatment, the discrimination of the foreign people toward the Filipino. Through painting, the great artist expressed his observation to the people of his society.

In Salazar’s own hommage, the violent use of red has a strong symbolic significance.  It overwhelms a viewer with it’s power - shouting, struggling  and fighting against extreme poverty and extreme corruption.  Here, we have two Philippine artists existing in two different ages, with over a hundred years of separation, yet still identifying with the same cause. The difference is the struggle against Spanish colonizers, versus a contemporary struggle against corrupt Indio politicians. Salazar’s 2005 Hommage represents the bloody scream of hopelessness and anger of today. A scream against apathy for Juan Luna, like a prayer expressed in paint on canvas. The two artists share the same cause, the same patriotism, the same struggle of being a Filipino in a foreign land.  One should feel the vibration of energy in each molecule of paint.  What already has been said is still not enough.

 Salazar continues his life as an artist in Paris. He has worked here for almost a decade. He expresses no wish to go back to his native land until the political climate has changed. He is obviously still very Filipino in his ways, in his thoughts, and his struggles. But he has adapted to his foreign environment, and perhaps been elevated above it.  He his driven by a fierce and tireless passion for knowledge and Art.

By: Che Hironaka 2009



BEYOND CONTEMPORARY REALITY

After moving to Paris from the Philippines less than a decade ago, Allanrey "Migz" Salazar is among the few Filipino artists who live their passion for art in Paris. He was essentially self-taught as a painter. His paintings organized into visual composition that can be experienced simultaneously without expecting delusion, and that can exert impact on the viewer on several physical, psychological, and emotional levels. It also posses a simple inner spirit; their creation and perception occur on a less complex level, where the perceptual and spiritual elements are fairly simple.

While having minimal colour but detailed accuracy and complexity of surface, the building blocks of the media would reveal them selves to cause a feeling of repose and simple transparency, of well-balanced parts. Metal bolts, washer, nuts and stud that puncture to and fro on its canvass is a distinctive feature of his works that correspond not only the firmness and steadiness attitude but will then eventually grasp both the conscious and unconscious to his work.

Salazar crafted his personal aesthetic approached through simple and rational medium that embodies his moral philosophy as well as an artistic practice. His paintings often appear like aged structure that had been a witness through the passage of time and ravaged by human intervention. By considering more attentively according to a regularly determined motion each of his pictures always results in re-shaping the whole space display.

Each works is the beginning of a silent reflection, allowing the viewer a freedom of imagination, interpretation, and emotional response that is not based on the literal or the descriptive, but rather on the greater depth of emotional and spiritual expressiveness that will go beyond contemporary reality.

By: B. Pavie 2006


 

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